2 Fully-Funded PhD Studentships on the Neurocognitive Foundations of Human-Robot Interaction

January 2018 – we are now looking to appoint two PhD students to begin doctoral training at the University of Glasgow in 2018.

 

2 Fully-Funded PhD Studentships on the Neurocognitive Foundations of Human-Robot Interaction
The successful candidates will use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate physiological and psychological aspects of how we perceive and interact with socially engaging robots. Candidates with an interest in delving into developmental or cross-cultural considerations for successful social interactions with robots are particularly encouraged to apply. Both PhD projects will involve working across psychology, human neuroscience, and computer science/robotics, and applicants should have training/experience in at least two of these three domains. It will be beneficial if interested candidates also share an interest in applied research. A solid understanding of research design and statistics is desirable. Programming experience (e.g. MATLAB/Python/PsychoPy/ePrime/Presentation) will be an advantage. The successful candidates will be joining the vibrant Social Robotics research group (www.so-bots.com), funded by the ERC starting grant ‘SOCIAL ROBOTS’, which will be based at the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology at the University of Glasgow.

Contact: Prof. Emily S. Cross (emily.cross@glasgow.ac.uk)

Applicants should have a first or upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in a relevant area. Applicants with a relevant Masters are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills and an ability to think creatively and work to deadlines.

An application including a 2-page CV, a 2-3 page research proposal on a topic or question you could envision studying during the PhD, and a 1-page covering letter explaining your motivation to join this research team should be e-mailed to Emily Cross (emily.cross@glasgow.ac.uk) by 5pm GMT on 8 March, 2018. Those called for interview (either in person or over skype) will be required to complete an online application form and prepare a brief presentation. It is also possible to meet the PI/research team at the HRI meeting in Chicago in March, if relevant. Please quote ‘Social Robots PhD’ in the subject line of any email correspondence.

Closing Date: 8 March 2018
Interviews: w/b 12 March 2018
Start date: Between 1 April – 1 October 2018
_____________________________________

Throughout the course of the 5 year Social Robots project (2016 – 2021), the research team will include a robotics/HRI specialist, two social/cognitive neuroscience postdoctoral research fellows, three PhD students, and a part-time research coordinator. Start dates for these positions are negotiable.  More details for specific positions currently being advertised can be found above when available. If you think you would make a fantastic addition to the Social Robots team, get in touch with Emily via e-mail (please include your CV) – emily [dot] cross [at] glasgow [dot] ac [dot] uk

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Summer RA positions available at the Harvard Music Lab

The Music Lab is the newest lab in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. We study the basic science of music in an effort to understand how and why humans produce and perceive music at all ages and across cultures. We are recruiting undergraduate research assistants in the fields of cognitive science, evolutionary biology, music theory, ethnomusicology, anthropology, linguistics, or computer science to spend their summer with us!

Summer RAs will be working on studies investigating universals in music perception and music production, people’s use of music in daily life, acoustics of music production in informal settings, studies of the impact of infant-directed song on infant affect and behavior, and long-term effects of the use of music in the home on parent and infant health. You can learn more about us and read our papers at themusiclab.org.

Here’s a non-exhaustive list of example summer projects that summer RAs will help to run:

1. Expanding our diverse collection of audio recordings for the Natural History of Song Project. Ideal for students with interests in ethnomusicology, anthropology, music theory, and exploration of non-western music.

2. In-lab studies exploring the degree to which music can function as a tool for parents to use when their infants are upset. This project will utilize a variety of research technologies, including wearable devices to track real-time physiological data from infants, motion tracking, emotion recognition, pupillometry, and more. Ideal for students interested in getting hands-on research experience running infant subjects in a developmental laboratory.

3. Crowd-sourced online studies about music categorization and perception using both traditional study pools of online workers and “citizen science” approaches. Ideal for students with interests in programming surveys, designing stimuli, and working with large, data sets from online participants.

4. Studies examining the possibility of links between synchronous activity (music or otherwise) and cooperation, prosociality, and interpersonal affinity. Ideal for students interested in social cognition and developing robust, replicable methods for online data collection.

5. Mobile app-based data collection from parents of infants and young children concerning infant/child temperament, parenting behaviors, and their relations to one another. Ideal for students interested in developing technical skills (e.g., SQL, JavaScript), developing methods for ecological momentary assessment, and applications of psychological research to health outcomes.

To apply, please fill out this google form: https://goo.gl/forms/iUR2mOltZieAxjZq1. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Academic credit or stipends may be available. Please send us your questions at musiclab+summer@g.harvard.edu.

Lab Coordinator Position in RISC Lab, Temple University

The Research in Spatial Cognition Lab at Temple University, directed by Drs. Nora Newcombe and Thomas Shipley, is seeking to hire a new lab coordinator. Information about this position can be found on our website.

Interested applicants should send a resume/CV and cover letter to Julia Erlanger (julia.erlanger@temple.edu). Review of applications will begin immediately.

Please distribute and share with colleagues/students who may find this of interest.

Child’s Play, Learning, & Development Lab Summer Internship at the University of Delaware!

 

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

CHILD’S PLAY, LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT LAB

ROBERTA GOLINKOFF

The Child’s Play, Learning and Development Lab, under the direction of Dr. Roberta Golinkoff, invites graduating seniors and undergraduate students to apply for an unpaid summer internship. Our laboratory, funded by federal grants and foundations, focuses on how children acquire language, develop early spatial concepts, encounter and learn from media, and learn through play. We value our research assistants and their names often appear on our submissions. This is an ideal way to gain research experience for students thinking of going on in a variety of fields such as psychology, speech pathology, and medicine. While there are few specific requirements, you must like children and be an eager learner and responsible individual!

Why you should apply:

Working at the Child’s Play Lab will allow you to experience, first hand, how research is conducted. You will learn the practical applications of research methods, participant recruitment, data collection, data coding, and data entry. Additionally, we will hold weekly lab meetings where we discuss cutting-edge research in developmental cognition. You will leave the lab having gained a significant amount of knowledge in language acquisition, research methodology, child cognition, and how to dissect research papers. This new learning can help you in any field you enter and will be useful to you in your classes!

Requirements:

  1. Some background in psychology or a related field.
  2. Basic computer skills.
  3. An eager and curious mind.
  4. Must be able to commit at least 20-30 hours/week for 8 weeks between June and August.

To Apply:

Complete and send the attached application form along with your unofficial university transcript, CV, and a letter of recommendation to the Laboratory Coordinators, Hannah Puttre, (hputtre@udel.edu) and Lindsey Foster (lfoster@udel.edu) no later than 5PM on March 23, 2018.

Questions?

Please contact the Laboratory Coordinators Hannah Puttre, (hputtre@udel.edu) and Lindsey Foster (lfoster@udel.edu). Find us online at www.childsplay.udel.edu.

Summer Internship in Language Development at the Center for Autism Research, CHOP

Stellar undergraduate students are invited to apply for an internship at the Center for Autism Research (CAR) at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). Students will be immersed in an environment of rigorous scientific research and training. As interns at CAR, students will contribute to ongoing scientific efforts focused on quantitative approaches to language, social cognition, and communication (including transcription), gain exposure to a rich array of projects across multiple areas of autism research, and attend lectures and training sessions. Summer interns will work under the supervision of Dr. Julia Parish-Morris and the Motor-Language Lab Research Assistants. The Lab collects, codes, and analyzes data from clinical research participants, with the following goals: identify linguistic markers of ASD; quantify ASD-specific patterns of movement; develop improved screening and treatment tools using advanced behavioral imaging.

 

The ideal candidate is energetic, diligent, and self-motivated. Applicants with experience in psychology, child development, speech-language pathology, clinical research, computer science, or linguistics are encouraged to apply, as well as applicants from other backgrounds with interest in these areas. The Center for Autism Research values diversity, and encourages applications from individuals that are traditionally underrepresented in the sciences, including individuals from different backgrounds, races, ethnic groups, and those from other diverse populations or economically disadvantaged backgrounds.

 

Applicants are invited to participate in an internship at CAR as part of an undergraduate course or thesis project, as part of a program with funding through their college or university, and as volunteer interns. Internships are available for year, summer, or academic year intervals. Interns must be available for 40 hours per week, Mondaythrough Friday, for a minimum of 10 weeks in the summer and a minimum of 10 hours per week for 2 semesters in the school year. Accepted interns will need to be able to complete the CHOP Non-traditional Personnel clearance process, including background checks, FBI fingerprinting, and occupational health screen prior to their start date. Information on how to complete the process will be provided to those selected. Projected summer internship start date is Tuesday, May 29th.

 

To apply for a summer position, please send your CV and cover letter to Leila Bateman at batemanl@chop.edu by March 1st, 2018. In your cover letter, detail your academic background and previous work experience, interest in language and autism research, and describe how this experience would contribute to your future goals. Students selected for the second round of consideration will be contacted for a phone or in-person interview.

Undergraduate Summer Workshop in Interdisciplinary Mind and Brain Studies at the University of Pennsylvania

The human capacity for complex language is unique within the animal kingdom, and psychologists have long appreciated how the languages we learn can shape our patterns of thought in subtle ways. Language science fosters collaboration between researchers in cognitive science, computer linguistics, psycholinguistics, and phonetics to drive research in language acquisition and use. This research aims to develop and improve language and speech technologies (e.g., automatic speech recognition, translation, and transcription). In addition, this research can develop computational tools to learn more about how the human brain works and how science understands social groups.

A related question at the interface of the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities is whether an understanding of the mind at the individual level will lead to a deeper understanding of the behaviors of a group. Research about social behavior and decision-making provides an important source of insight into the philosophical questions of mind, identity, and social organization. The development of new analytical, computational, and experimental tools is enhancing our understandings of individuals, societies, and their creations. These newest scientific frontiers seek to understand the nature of human intelligence in its broadest sense.

In this year’s Undergraduate Summer Workshop, lectures will focus on Language Science and Technology (one week) and Social and Behavioral Science (one week). Social and Decision Science topics are likely to include cultural and evolutionary behavior, economic preferences and biases, social choices and decision-making, and reflective and intuitive thinking. Language Science topics may include how children learn the meanings of words and the grammar of their language, how language and dialects change over time, and how the mind represents language.

Summer Workshop participants will receive free room and board, plus a travel stipend.

As a participant, you can:

  • Hear lectures from distinguished researchers in social and decision sciences and language science and technology
  • Participate in labs and lab tours involving some of the latest technologies and research methods
  • Participate in panel discussions on the future of interdisciplinary mind and brain studies, as well as career and professional development in these fields.

You should apply if:

  • You have a strong interest in social and decision sciences and/or language science
  • You are currently an enrolled undergraduate at any university or college
  • You are thinking about applying to graduate school
  • You are available to attend the entire program

 

Relevant course experience is desired, but not required. Students from underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply.

Non-US citizens are eligible for our program, but US visa regulations apply for all non-citizens.

Questions? Please e-mail us: IMBsummerworkshop@sas.upenn.edu

Click here to apply to the 2018 Workshop!

We require a resume, transcript, and short personal statement, as well as 2 letters of recommendation. Applicants are asked to contact their referees to request their letters of recommendation.

The deadline for applications and reference letters is March 1, 2018.

The IMB Summer Workshop is sponsored by MindCORE, Penn’s hub for the integrative study of the mind.

Click here for a printable PDF of this page.

Summer 2018 Internship Opportunity: Berkeley Early Learning Lab

Dr. Fei Xu’s Berkeley Early Learning Lab (BELL), located on the main campus of the University of California, Berkeley, is now accepting applications from highly motivated undergraduates and graduating seniors for our Summer Internship Program in 2018.

Descriptions of the Program
The goal of this internship is to provide hands on research experience to students interested in pursuing graduate work in Cognitive and Language Development or a related field. Successful applicants will be paired with a graduate student or postdoc mentor and will have the opportunity to conduct research at local children’s museums and in the lab, and collaborate on a variety of on-going and new projects. Our lab uses looking time, eye tracking, free play, intervention, and other behavioral methods to investigate inductive learning and statistical inference in social cognition, category learning, physical reasoning, causal learning, word learning, and other domains.

In addition to collaboration with individual graduate students and work on specific projects, weekly lab meetings will give interns a chance to present their own work for feedback and provide feedback to others. We will also discuss current papers being published that relate to the lab’s projects.

Eligibilities
Berkeley affiliated and Non-Berkeley undergraduates who are interested in developmental psychology and cognitive science are welcome to apply to our summer internship program. Applicants should have some course work in developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, basic computer skills (programming skills are highly desirable), and experience working with children.

Commitments
This is an unpaid internship and requires a commitment of 20-30 hours/week for 8 weeks between June 4 and July 27.​
To apply
1. Please fill out the application questionnaire (https://goo.gl/forms/VE2wv4XyDeAn2srh1)
2. In the application, you will be asked to upload your CV and cover letter detailing relevant coursework, research experience, and reasons to apply. They must be in PDF format.
3. If any issues arise during the application process, please contact the lab manager, Harmonie Strohl at babylab@berkeley.edu.

The application deadline is March 16, 2018 11:59p.m. PST.

If you have further questions about the program, please refer to our website (http://babylab.berkeley.edu) or contact us at babylab@berkeley.edu.

Summer RA positions available at the Harvard Music Lab

The Music Lab is the newest lab in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. We study the basic science of music in an effort to understand how and why humans produce and perceive music at all ages and across cultures. We are recruiting undergraduate research assistants in the fields of cognitive science, evolutionary biology, music theory, ethnomusicology, anthropology, linguistics, or computer science to spend their summer with us!

Summer RAs will be working on studies investigating universals in music perception and music production, people’s use of music in daily life, acoustics of music production in informal settings, studies of the impact of infant-directed song on infant affect and behavior, and long-term effects of the use of music in the home on parent and infant health. You can learn more about us and read our papers at themusiclab.org.

Here’s a non-exhaustive list of example summer projects that summer RAs will help to run:

1. Expanding our diverse collection of audio recordings for the Natural History of Song Project. Ideal for students with interests in ethnomusicology, anthropology, music theory, and exploration of non-western music.

2. In-lab studies exploring the degree to which music can function as a tool for parents to use when their infants are upset. This project will utilize a variety of research technologies, including wearable devices to track real-time physiological data from infants, motion tracking, emotion recognition, pupillometry, and more. Ideal for students interested in getting hands-on research experience running infant subjects in a developmental laboratory.

3. Crowd-sourced online studies about music categorization and perception using both traditional study pools of online workers and “citizen science” approaches. Ideal for students with interests in programming surveys, designing stimuli, and working with large, data sets from online participants.

4. Studies examining the possibility of links between synchronous activity (music or otherwise) and cooperation, prosociality, and interpersonal affinity. Ideal for students interested in social cognition and developing robust, replicable methods for online data collection.

5. Mobile app-based data collection from parents of infants and young children concerning infant/child temperament, parenting behaviors, and their relations to one another. Ideal for students interested in developing technical skills (e.g., SQL, JavaScript), developing methods for ecological momentary assessment, and applications of psychological research to health outcomes.

To apply, please fill out this google form: https://goo.gl/forms/iUR2mOltZieAxjZq1. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Academic credit or stipends may be available. Please send us your questions at musiclab+summer@g.harvard.edu.

2 PhD Positions in Developmental Psychology at the University of Bremen

The new Developmental and Educational Psychology Research Group at the University of Bremen invites applications for 2 PhD positions (50% position, initially for 3 years with possibility for extension, salary scale “TV-L E13”) starting April 1, 2018. The research group will be directed by Marco F. H. Schmidt (currently at LMU Munich) and is part of the Institute of Psychology, to be re-established at the University of Bremen.

In our group, we study infants’ and children’s social-cognitive development, broadly construed. In particular, we investigate the developmental origins of human normativity and morality, including in interrelations with epistemology, theory of mind, and prosocial behavior. Empirical methods include, inter alia, interview techniques,interactive behavioral paradigms, and eye-tracking experiments.

Candidates should hold a Master’s degree (or equivalent) in Psychology or a related discipline, and have a strong interest in developing their own research projects within the broad theme of the group. Excellent German language skills are strongly desirable, given teaching responsibilities (2 hours per week during the semester) and interaction with children and parents. Research experience in experimental studies with infants or children is advantageous, but not necessary.

Interested candidates should submit via e-mail (subject: “PhD Bremen”) the following to Marco Schmidt (marco.schmidt@psy.lmu.de) as a single PDF attachment by February 5, 2018: a full CV, copies of diplomas, a brief research statement, and two (or more) e-mail addresses of potential academic referees. Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the positions are filled. The University of Bremen is an equal opportunity employer.

For more information on our research, please visit our current website (http://www.psy.lmu.de/normativity_en/index.html). For questions, please contact Marco Schmidt (marco.schmidt@psy.lmu.de).